1. Banksy Strikes Again!

    The “guerrilla artist” Banksy is believed to be behind a piece of street art depicting three shadowy covert figures conducting surveillance at a telephone box just three miles from the Government listening post GCHQ.

    The piece has already attracted hundreds of visitors, and is said to have virtually doubled the value of the property it’s been created on overnight.

    A GCHQ spokesperson said: “This is the first time we have ever been asked to comment on art.

    "Although we are not qualified critics, we are as intrigued as the rest of the residents of Cheltenham about the appearance of the mysterious artwork.

    "For those who are interested, our website gives a glimpse of what modern-day intelligence operatives are really like, although some may be disappointed by the lack of trench coats and dark glasses.”

  2. Michelangelo's David | The Scheming Behind The Sculpture

    http://www.artnews.com/2014/04/14/how-michelangelo-made-david-into-a-giant/#.U0wC_j37ZpI.tumblr

  3. Something For The Weekend.
In 1965 Bob Dylan picked up an electric guitar and changed the face of rock and roll music forever. In 2014 he challenges our perception of him as an artist.
Today we’re delighted to announce the launch of hand signed limited edition silkscreens on canvas and paper from Bob Dylan, entitled Revisionist Art.
View the collection here or head down to one of our galleries and check it out this weekend.

    Something For The Weekend.

    In 1965 Bob Dylan picked up an electric guitar and changed the face of rock and roll music forever. In 2014 he challenges our perception of him as an artist.

    Today we’re delighted to announce the launch of hand signed limited edition silkscreens on canvas and paper from Bob Dylan, entitled Revisionist Art.

    View the collection here or head down to one of our galleries and check it out this weekend.

  4. Something For The Weekend
I’m a Dandy Lion, A Fate I Don’t Deserve!, by Craig Davison
  5. CALLING AMATEUR ARTISTS
BBC One is on the hunt for the best of Britain’s amateur artists for a new competitive arts series.
The programme is looking for amateur painters from all over the UK who have a passion for painting and drawing. If you are over 16 and like a creative challenge, they want to hear from you.
The deadline is this Sunday, 23 March, so be quick if you want to apply!
Find out more & apply here.

    CALLING AMATEUR ARTISTS

    BBC One is on the hunt for the best of Britain’s amateur artists for a new competitive arts series.

    The programme is looking for amateur painters from all over the UK who have a passion for painting and drawing. If you are over 16 and like a creative challenge, they want to hear from you.

    The deadline is this Sunday, 23 March, so be quick if you want to apply!

    Find out more & apply here.

  6. Something [Sunny] For The Weekend
Chalk Cliffs, by Paul Corfield
This piece is inspired by the cliffs at the mouth of Poole Harbour in Dorset, UK. Paul oftens paints this area close to his home but for ‘Chalk Cliffs’ he travelled to Swanage Bay to gain a new perspective.

    Something [Sunny] For The Weekend

    Chalk Cliffs, by Paul Corfield

    This piece is inspired by the cliffs at the mouth of Poole Harbour in Dorset, UK. Paul oftens paints this area close to his home but for ‘Chalk Cliffs’ he travelled to Swanage Bay to gain a new perspective.

  7. FLORA & FAUNA
These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.
See more on his website. FLORA & FAUNA
These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.
See more on his website. FLORA & FAUNA
These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.
See more on his website. FLORA & FAUNA
These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.
See more on his website. FLORA & FAUNA
These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.
See more on his website.

    FLORA & FAUNA

    These anatomical collages by Travis Bedel caught our eye this afternoon because of the way they transform recognisable scientific diagrams into exotic and colourful works of art.

    See more on his website.

    (via weedytheneedy)

  8. SNEAK PEEK FROM BOB BARKER
These four pieces are new and exclusive limited edition prints by popular nostalgic artist Bob Barker.
Each are editions of only 25 and are expected to sell out fast!
For more information please contact your nearest Castle Galleries. SNEAK PEEK FROM BOB BARKER
These four pieces are new and exclusive limited edition prints by popular nostalgic artist Bob Barker.
Each are editions of only 25 and are expected to sell out fast!
For more information please contact your nearest Castle Galleries. SNEAK PEEK FROM BOB BARKER
These four pieces are new and exclusive limited edition prints by popular nostalgic artist Bob Barker.
Each are editions of only 25 and are expected to sell out fast!
For more information please contact your nearest Castle Galleries. SNEAK PEEK FROM BOB BARKER
These four pieces are new and exclusive limited edition prints by popular nostalgic artist Bob Barker.
Each are editions of only 25 and are expected to sell out fast!
For more information please contact your nearest Castle Galleries.

    SNEAK PEEK FROM BOB BARKER

    These four pieces are new and exclusive limited edition prints by popular nostalgic artist Bob Barker.

    Each are editions of only 25 and are expected to sell out fast!

    For more information please contact your nearest Castle Galleries.

  9. “PHOTOSHOP IS MY SKETCH BOOK”
Chris Acheson took time away from his studio to tell us about his new collection of limited edition art.
CG: What is your creative process?
CA: The starting point to most of my work, once I have found a location, is to take numerous photographs. Then back in the studio I will pick out what I consider to be the best image and then work on it in Photoshop.
Before I commit the piece to canvas, I always go back to the original photo shoot and all the different photos that I took. Often I find that an image I initially rejected is in fact stronger than the one I have been working on, and then that gets selected for painting instead.
I consider Photoshop to be my sketchbook.
CG: Which artists have influenced you?
CA: Many artists have inspired me, my favourites include Norman Rockwell, Edward Hopper, John Millais, Jeff Koons, L.S. Lowry, to name a few!
CG: What is it about street culture that inspires you?
CA: It’s often the everyday imagery of my immediate surroundings that inspires me to add things to a piece of work, such as the pop culture inherent in street advertising and shop signage. 

I feel my new collection works especially well because of the mannequin pieces, as the imagery mirrored from the outside world offers a contrast between everyday life and the staged world of the merchandised shop window display.
Take a look at Chris’ collection of limited edition art.
(Above: The Metamorphosis, by Chris Acheson)

    “PHOTOSHOP IS MY SKETCH BOOK”

    Chris Acheson took time away from his studio to tell us about his new collection of limited edition art.

    CG: What is your creative process?

    CA: The starting point to most of my work, once I have found a location, is to take numerous photographs. Then back in the studio I will pick out what I consider to be the best image and then work on it in Photoshop.

    Before I commit the piece to canvas, I always go back to the original photo shoot and all the different photos that I took. Often I find that an image I initially rejected is in fact stronger than the one I have been working on, and then that gets selected for painting instead.

    I consider Photoshop to be my sketchbook.

    CG: Which artists have influenced you?

    CA: Many artists have inspired me, my favourites include Norman Rockwell, Edward Hopper, John Millais, Jeff Koons, L.S. Lowry, to name a few!

    CG: What is it about street culture that inspires you?

    CA: It’s often the everyday imagery of my immediate surroundings that inspires me to add things to a piece of work, such as the pop culture inherent in street advertising and shop signage. 

    I feel my new collection works especially well because of the mannequin pieces, as the imagery mirrored from the outside world offers a contrast between everyday life and the staged world of the merchandised shop window display.

    Take a look at Chris’ collection of limited edition art.

    (Above: The Metamorphosis, by Chris Acheson)

  10. GOOD IDEA? BAD IDEA?
Sculptor Nic Joly chatted to Castle Galleries about his miniature sculptures and how they tackle taboo subjects.
CG: What is it about the miniature that fascinates you?
NJ: Since childhood I have been intrigued by the small, having loved ‘Gulliver’s Travels’ and ‘The Borrowers’.  The idea that there is a subculture existing beyond our sight is a wonderful thought. I have taken this idea and pushed it further in my work.
We are all important small parts in a big world, with issues, secrets, feelings and stories that remain under the surface and hidden.  These areas of my life and other people’s fascinate me.
CG: Please tell us more about the process of creating your miniature figures – it must be very painstaking work! Do you work with magnifying glasses?
NJ: I never use a magnifying glass for my work, the reason being is I love imperfections,  and I think I would go more crazy than I already am if I used one!
With my original works the figures are made from wire, thread, clay, paper and paint.  All are individually carved and made for the scenes I wish to create.  For the limited edition works, I have found the only way to get the detail I want is a fairly long process.  Firstly the originals are 3D scanned, then 3D printed in wax. From these waxes the moulds are individually made to create the figures in bronze.  Then I have to file, fettle and clean up the casts ready for painting and positioning.
CG: Which is your favourite piece from your new collection and what is the story behind it?
NJ: My favourite pieces from the collection are:  Good Idea? and Bad Idea?.  I created these pieces to highlight the choices we have to make in our lives between good and bad, the ying and yang of the lives we lead. I took two well known symbols of good and bad; Jesus for good and Satan for bad, and contained them in light bulbs, using the bulbs as a way to turn them into metaphorical ideas.
CG: Some of your work deals with taboo subjects but do you ever have ideas for new works that you think are just “too out there”?
NJ: The dark side in myself and others fascinates me.  We all have secrets, experiences and thoughts that are deemed taboo, but they are not.  These aspects of our lives make us who we are.  Sometimes I come across ideas that are “too out there”, but I love them and consider how people would react when they are faced with them.
When I exhibit my more shocking pieces, I find that people feel in control of the subjects because of the scale of the work and the fact it’s behind glass, which means I can get away with murder!
CG: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given in terms of becoming a professional artist?

NJ: As long as you work as hard as you can, never give up and love what you do, the rewards will come as sure as night follows day.
Take a look at Nic’s collection of limited edition art.
(Above: Good Idea? and Bad Idea?, both by Nic Joly) GOOD IDEA? BAD IDEA?
Sculptor Nic Joly chatted to Castle Galleries about his miniature sculptures and how they tackle taboo subjects.
CG: What is it about the miniature that fascinates you?
NJ: Since childhood I have been intrigued by the small, having loved ‘Gulliver’s Travels’ and ‘The Borrowers’.  The idea that there is a subculture existing beyond our sight is a wonderful thought. I have taken this idea and pushed it further in my work.
We are all important small parts in a big world, with issues, secrets, feelings and stories that remain under the surface and hidden.  These areas of my life and other people’s fascinate me.
CG: Please tell us more about the process of creating your miniature figures – it must be very painstaking work! Do you work with magnifying glasses?
NJ: I never use a magnifying glass for my work, the reason being is I love imperfections,  and I think I would go more crazy than I already am if I used one!
With my original works the figures are made from wire, thread, clay, paper and paint.  All are individually carved and made for the scenes I wish to create.  For the limited edition works, I have found the only way to get the detail I want is a fairly long process.  Firstly the originals are 3D scanned, then 3D printed in wax. From these waxes the moulds are individually made to create the figures in bronze.  Then I have to file, fettle and clean up the casts ready for painting and positioning.
CG: Which is your favourite piece from your new collection and what is the story behind it?
NJ: My favourite pieces from the collection are:  Good Idea? and Bad Idea?.  I created these pieces to highlight the choices we have to make in our lives between good and bad, the ying and yang of the lives we lead. I took two well known symbols of good and bad; Jesus for good and Satan for bad, and contained them in light bulbs, using the bulbs as a way to turn them into metaphorical ideas.
CG: Some of your work deals with taboo subjects but do you ever have ideas for new works that you think are just “too out there”?
NJ: The dark side in myself and others fascinates me.  We all have secrets, experiences and thoughts that are deemed taboo, but they are not.  These aspects of our lives make us who we are.  Sometimes I come across ideas that are “too out there”, but I love them and consider how people would react when they are faced with them.
When I exhibit my more shocking pieces, I find that people feel in control of the subjects because of the scale of the work and the fact it’s behind glass, which means I can get away with murder!
CG: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given in terms of becoming a professional artist?

NJ: As long as you work as hard as you can, never give up and love what you do, the rewards will come as sure as night follows day.
Take a look at Nic’s collection of limited edition art.
(Above: Good Idea? and Bad Idea?, both by Nic Joly)

    GOOD IDEA? BAD IDEA?

    Sculptor Nic Joly chatted to Castle Galleries about his miniature sculptures and how they tackle taboo subjects.

    CG: What is it about the miniature that fascinates you?

    NJ: Since childhood I have been intrigued by the small, having loved ‘Gulliver’s Travels’ and ‘The Borrowers’.  The idea that there is a subculture existing beyond our sight is a wonderful thought. I have taken this idea and pushed it further in my work.

    We are all important small parts in a big world, with issues, secrets, feelings and stories that remain under the surface and hidden.  These areas of my life and other people’s fascinate me.

    CG: Please tell us more about the process of creating your miniature figures – it must be very painstaking work! Do you work with magnifying glasses?

    NJ: I never use a magnifying glass for my work, the reason being is I love imperfections,  and I think I would go more crazy than I already am if I used one!

    With my original works the figures are made from wire, thread, clay, paper and paint.  All are individually carved and made for the scenes I wish to create.  For the limited edition works, I have found the only way to get the detail I want is a fairly long process.  Firstly the originals are 3D scanned, then 3D printed in wax. From these waxes the moulds are individually made to create the figures in bronze.  Then I have to file, fettle and clean up the casts ready for painting and positioning.

    CG: Which is your favourite piece from your new collection and what is the story behind it?

    NJ: My favourite pieces from the collection are:  Good Idea? and Bad Idea?.  I created these pieces to highlight the choices we have to make in our lives between good and bad, the ying and yang of the lives we lead. I took two well known symbols of good and bad; Jesus for good and Satan for bad, and contained them in light bulbs, using the bulbs as a way to turn them into metaphorical ideas.

    CG: Some of your work deals with taboo subjects but do you ever have ideas for new works that you think are just “too out there”?

    NJ: The dark side in myself and others fascinates me.  We all have secrets, experiences and thoughts that are deemed taboo, but they are not.  These aspects of our lives make us who we are.  Sometimes I come across ideas that are “too out there”, but I love them and consider how people would react when they are faced with them.

    When I exhibit my more shocking pieces, I find that people feel in control of the subjects because of the scale of the work and the fact it’s behind glass, which means I can get away with murder!

    CG: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given in terms of becoming a professional artist?

    NJ: As long as you work as hard as you can, never give up and love what you do, the rewards will come as sure as night follows day.

    Take a look at Nic’s collection of limited edition art.

    (Above: Good Idea? and Bad Idea?, both by Nic Joly)

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